Fig and Goat Cheese Flatbread

August 31, 2017

 

 

 

Sometimes the photo doesn't turn out as good as we wanted. I was making this flatbread for my parents and I was rushing to get any photo, let alone a good one before I could get this flatbread on the table; they were hungry, tired, and jet lag. But the flatbread turned out so good, and so many of you reacted to the photo on Instagram stories, that I knew I had to get the recipe up. 

 

The recipe for the dough comes from Uri Scheft's Breaking Breads. Scheft is the chef behind Lehamim Bakery in Israel and Breads Bakery in New York, both home to the most insane babka you've ever had. I've linked the cookbook down below. If you're someone who loves yeast-based creations as much as I do - GET THIS BOOK! 

 

Makes 4 personal size flatbreads

Ingredients: 

For the dough:

1/2 cup room temperature water 

2 tablespoons (2 packets) instant yeast 

4 cups all purpose flour, sifted + more for kneading and shaping

1 tablespoon sugar 

2 teaspoons salt 

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil 

1/2 cup Goat's milk yogurt (*if you can't find goat's milk yogurt, use a mild full-fat Greek yogurt)

 

Toppings:

1 2/3 cups Goat's milk yogurt (same note as above)

2 tablespoons za'atar 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 cup arugula 

6 fresh figs

1/2 pound goat cheese 

5 tablespoons of honey (for drizzling)

finishing salt, like Maldon salt 

 

1. Pour the water into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Pour the yeast into the water and use your hands to dissolve the yeast into the water. Add the sifted flour, sugar, salt, olive oil and yogurt and mix on low speed until the dough comes together, about one minute. (If the dough is dry, add water 1 tablespoon at a time. If the dough is too sticky, add flour 1 tablespoon at a time.) 

2. Increase the speed to medium high and mix until the dough is smooth and soft, about two minutes. Stop the mixer incrementally to scrape down the sides of the bowl or the dough hook, as needed. 

3. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and dust the top of the dough with more flour. Take the top corner of the dough (the part furthest away from you) and stretch it away until it rips, then fold it over the middle. Repeat this process with the remaining 3 sides. (If you have questions here please reach out and I'll clarify.) Transfer the dough to a lightly floured bowl and dust the dough with more flour. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm spot (oven or microwave turned off are good options) until the dough has doubled, about one hour. **Make ahead: you can make this dough a day in advance and store it in the fridge until you are ready to make the flatbreads. 

4. Once the dough has doubled, divide the dough into four equal pieces. Use your hands to gently pull the corners of the dough ball down and under to create a ball shape. Be careful not to work the dough too much. Repeat this with all four pieces. Place them on a lightly floured work surface and cover with a clean kitchen towel to allow them to rest for 5 minutes. 

5. On a lightly floured work surface, roll each ball of dough into a 5-by-11 inch oval and transfer them to lightly floured sheet pans. Cover with kitchen towel and allow to rise in a warm spot for another 30 minutes. 

6. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

7. Prepare the toppings: Make the yogurt topping by whisking together the yogurt, za'atar and salt. Slice the figs thinly. Cut the goat cheese into small medallion size pieces. 

8. Divide the yogurt evenly among the four flatbreads and brush it over the length of the flatbread, leaving about 1/4 inch for a crust. Cover the flatbread with a hand full of arugula and then strategically place several slices of fig and several of your goat cheese bites around the length of the flatbread. 

9. Place the flatbreads in the oven and cook until the crust hardens and browns slightly, 15 - 20 minutes. 

10. Remove from the oven and let the breads cool slightly before finishing with Maldon salt and drizzling with honey. (Honey drizzle tip: The first drop of honey is going to be the heaviest, so let the first drop fall off to the side and then continue to drizzle over the flatbread)

 

 

 

 

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